Resynchronising the Heart in Heart Failure

Today’s vlog is on the subject of heart failure and in particular on a special type of pacemaker which can make a significant improvement to the quality of life and length of life in patients with heart failure. What is heart failure? The heart is a pump and if the heart is in some way damaged - be that by a heart attack or a virus or harmful drugs then the heart is unable to pump out enough blood [...]

Leaky Heart Valves

 We are blessed with 4 heart valves - 2 on the left side which are known as the mitral and aortic valves and 2 on the right side - the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Sometimes due to a congenital problem, age related changes or even an acquired cause, these valves can start leaking and when they do so to a  severe extent, they can adversely  impact on a patient’s quality of life as well as their [...]

Heart Failure – Does Testosterone Hold the Key?

One of the reasons I wanted to start this channel was because of my frustration at how limited we were when it came to treating heart disease patients. Of course one of the reasons for this is that we simply don't know enough but another reason was that medicine as a whole has become very defensive. Offer the patient only those therapies which are recommended by clinical guidelines because that is [...]

The Management of Chronic Disease

I wanted to tell you a story about a patient who recently contacted me for advice.  This particular lady was in her 50s in a very prestigious and high powered post and completely fit and well. She was married, had a daughter in Australia and had a wonderful social life with hiking with her girlfriends. Around Xmas time in 2020, she developed a flu-like illness and after that she started noticing t [...]

What do heart tests tell us?

Broadly speaking there are 3 things that can go wrong with the heart. The heart is a pump and that pump may be faulty either due to congenital problem or an acquired problem. If the pump is in any way defective then not as much blood comes out of the heart and the body and all our vital organs will get less blood than they should and this could lead to harm. So cardiomyopathies, valve problems, my [...]

Lessons from Shane Warne’s death – A cardiologist’s perspective

As a doctor and cardiologist, I see heart attacks and death on a daily basis and after a while one gets used to it and it feels like nothing can shock anymore. However, I was completely shocked yesterday when I heard about Shane Warne’s death from a suspected heart attack. Firstly he was only 52. Secondly he was a world class athlete only a few years ago. Thirdly from the news it seems that he was [...]

AF and Dementia

The first thing I want to say is that unfortunately the practice of modern day medicine is largely servile to clinical guidelines. We decide how to treat a patient based on how someone else (i.e whoever wrote the guideline) tells us how to manage the patient. If we stick to the guideline, we feel that we are offering top quality care and we can defend ourselves in court. If we don't stick to the g [...]

By |January 17th, 2022|2 Comments

Intracoronary Stents

Today’s video is on the subject of intracoronary stents. In this video, I will talk about what stents are, why they are used and what benefits and risks are associated with their implantation. The first thing to understand is that for most of us, as we get older, the major risk to our health will be progressive  ‘wear and tear’ in our heart arteries (coronary arteries). There are 2 problems with t [...]

The Gender Gap: Women and heart disease

As a cardiologist, I am always thinking of heart health and heart disease. More recently, I was at a raucous party and I saw a bunch of overweight middle-aged men smoking, drinking and overeating and I couldn’t help thinking of all the damage that was potentially happening in their heart arteries. What was interesting however was that there were lots of similarly overweight, smoking and overeating [...]

By |December 6th, 2021|Tags: |2 Comments

POTS: The 4 pillars of management

POTS stands for Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome. This means that patients with this condition find that they feel unwell with symptoms of tremulousness, dizziness and heart palpitations when they stand up. On objective assessment,there is an exaggerated and sustained increase in heart rate (> 30 beats/ per minute in adults; >40 beats per minute in children) compared to when the pat [...]

By |December 6th, 2021|3 Comments

Heart attacks in the young: The case of Siddharth Shukla

My name is Sanjay Gupta and I am a cardiologist in York.  Today’s blog is on the subject of heart attacks. As many of you have probably come to know, the whole of India is in mourning after one of its brightest TV and film stars, Siddharth Shukla, died suddenly at the age of only 40 years.  Initial reports have suggested that Siddhartha died of a massive heart attack. Here was a wonderfully athlet [...]

By |November 20th, 2021|1 Comment

Sudden Cardiac Death: The case of Puneeth Raj Kumar

On 29/10/21, the Indian Film industry lost another of its young and bright stars to an unexpected cardiac arrest. Puneeth Raj Kumar was only 46 years old, was a healthy fitness enthusiast and had just finished at the gym and then started complaining of intense fatigue. Unfortunately his heart then went into a very fast but ineffective rhythm called ventricular fibrillation. As no blood was being c [...]

By |November 20th, 2021|1 Comment

Vitamin C: A genuine natural treatment for AF?

Atrial fibrillation is a common heart rhythm disturbance which may impact on both quality and quantity of life.  AF can also come and go and when a patient does develop an episode of AF, they can be very symptomatic with palpitations, breathlessness, fatigue and tiredness. We also know that AF begets AF. The more AF, you get the more you will have in the future. Whilst there are many pharmaceutica [...]

Low dose Naltrexone for POTS?

One of my specialist interests is in a condition called POTS (postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome). This is a condition that affects young patients (more women than men) who struggle with severe chronic fatigue, an inability to stand up for a prolonged period of time, heart palpitations, brain fog, lack of refreshing sleep, IBS-like gut issues, fibromyalgia and chronic pain. Despite self man [...]

NOCTURNAL HYPERTENSION

The subject of high blood pressure is both confusing and hugely anxiety-provoking for patients. The unfortunate thing is that many medical practitioners also don’t quite understand blood pressure and this shows in how blood pressure is managed in modern-day medicine. What is a complex underlying process has now been simplified to a set of 2 numbers and if those 2 numbers are higher that what a bun [...]

TYPE 2 DIABETES – This medication can make you live longer!

Today’s video is on the subject of Type 2 Diabetes and an incredible set of medications that have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, kidney disease and death in patients with type 2 Diabetes. I can guarantee that every single person watching this video will know someone who has type 2 Diabetes and i would urge would anyone with type 2 diabetes to watch this video as the [...]

Bicuspid Aortic Valve

The aortic valve is the exit valve of the heart. When the heart contracts, it forces open this one-way valve to push the blood out into the main blood vessel, the aorta, from where the blood goes to the rest of the body. If there is a problem with this valve, then the heart may not be able to pump blood out as efficiently and this will impact on how much blood is delivered to the rest of the body. [...]

Sick Sinus Syndrome

The heart is a muscle that needs an electrical current to make it contract. That electrical current is generated and conducted around the heart from an area at the top of the heart called the Sino-atrial node. The Sino-atrial node therefore is the heart’s pacemaker. The pacemaker’s job is to generate a heart rate commensurate with the physiological needs of the body at any given time. When this go [...]

By |November 23rd, 2020|6 Comments

HRT and the heart Good, bad or ugly?

  The arrival of menopause can be particularly distressing both mentally and physically. A number of conditions are associated with menopause. These include hot flashes, an increase in incidence of osteoporosis, alzheimer’s, vaginal atrophy and cardiovascular disease. At the beginning of the 20th century, the FDA approved an estrogen replacement medication called Premearin for the treatment o [...]

By |November 23rd, 2020|1 Comment

Familial AF – Understanding the genie in the bottle

AF is commonly seen in older patients with multiple comorbidities such as diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, vascular disease and sleep apnoea. When those patients ask me why they developed AF, I tend to blame it on age, lifestyle and inflammation and say to them that maybe AF is a symptom of these underlying problems. However there is another group of patients that I see with AF. These are y [...]

By |November 19th, 2020|3 Comments

Measuring inflammation: What does CRP tell us?

Most chronic disease is caused by underlying low grade chronic inflammation.  In cardiology, one of our biggest challenges in atherosclerosis (which refers to wear and tear of the blood vessels which supply our vital organs) and these blood vessels are also prone to increased wear and tear which results in progressive damage to the vessel walls and the devlopment of plaque within the vessels. This [...]

By |October 12th, 2020|4 Comments

Testosterone and the Heart

Testosterone is the principal male sex hormone and we know that in general, as men get above the age of 40, testosterone levels start dropping. We also know that as men get above the age of 40, their overall cardiac risk and overall risk of mortality starts increasing. So it appears that overall cardiac risk starts going up around about the same time as testosterone levels start falling. What we s [...]

AFib and bad kidneys: A toxic combo

One of the long term consequences of chronic conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and even severe obesity is the development of chronic kidney disease. In fact it is estimated that the number of patients with chronic kidney disease is more than doubling every decade. What is also a major concern is that as chronic kidney disease is an exceptionally inflammatory condition, it substantia [...]

AF in the Young

Most of the AF we see occurs in older patients - usually those above the age of 60 and therefore much of what we know about AF comes from studies involving older patients. What we are however beginning to realise is that AF can occur in younger patients too and perhaps this group of patients represents a group that we do need to study and research a lot more because what we understand about the ca [...]

Go to Top